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The Ruined Man is out!

That’s right. My paranormal thriller The Ruined Man is available for early purchase before the official release date on Friday. Get your copy of The Ruined Man paperback!

And check out the trailer up on Youtube. 

The Ruined Man Trailer 

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Finished!

After a grueling editing process, I’ve finally got a reading copy of my new manuscript ready! That’s right! I finished another book. It’s an exciting supernatural thriller set in New Mexico. I’d like to have a few people read it before I start shopping it around. If you’re interested, drop me a line and lemme know!

This Just In! Chupacabra Elected to City Council

In a small New Mexico town, history is being made. It seems that a Chupacabra has been elected to the City Council following Tuesday’s elections.

The Chupacabra, who goes by the Americanized name Jorge McPherson, won in a landslide victory, despite being a third-party candidate. McPhereson ran on the Goat Sucker Party ticket, a political party that he and other Chupacabras formed late in 2004 during the little publicized Reality Rights Movement for Imaginary Characters.

That landmark event opened the way to freedom to live a public life for people like McPherson who had been perceived as “nonexistent” or “imaginary” up to that point. Now, thanks to Reality Rights, McPherson and a whole slew of other “fictional” creatures are able to have a voice. McPherson used his voice to run for City Council.

“America is a great place,” he told TJI in a recent interview. “I barely come to this country and already I am in charge!”

McPherson reportedly migrated north from deep in the Amazonian jungles with his clan of Chupacabras. Once they crossed the border into America, establishing citizenship was a breeze.

“They just give you a license. All you do is go ask. And they say, ‘Where’s your birth certificate?’ and you say, ‘It was stolen by the gringos’. And they give you a driver’s license right there on the spot! I don’t like my picture though.”

After establishing residency and opening a small convenience store, McPhereson’s next logical step was into local politics.

“I was at the cantina one night after work. This was just after I got here and opened up my store. I asked my amigo Billy, ‘Who is in charge here’? Billy tells me the City Council runs the town. And I tell him, ‘I will lead this City Council.’ He laughed at me. He died mysteriously later that night. It is a dangerous town,” he shrugs, “you never know what is out to chupa you. And now, I am laughing at him.” McPherson smiles, flashing a set of razor sharp teeth. I thought it best to move on.

Garnering voter support was not a problem for McPherson.

“My family helped me a lot. We went from door to door. Everyone in town! And we asked everybody, ‘You like your cabras [goats—J.]?’ And they say, ‘Yes. We love our cabras’. And then I say, ‘Then you should vote for me. I will keep your cabras from getting chupa’d. If you do not vote for me…’ Then I shrug like I don’t know what will happen. But I know,” mischief lights his eyes, “I am a Chupacabra, see? I suck goats! And they voted for me! Everybody!”

He wasn’t lying. Literally everybody (all 236 residents) voted for McPherson sending his opponent, incumbent Democrat Eddie Espinoza, into cardiac failure from utter shock. McPherson is the second fictional character to hold a public office. If you will remember, Arnold Schwarzenegger was the first when he was elected governor of California.

McPherson has big plans for his city. Including turning the tiny village into the Goat Capital of the World complete with a festival, parade and the whole deal.

“What can I say? I love cabras.”

And the townsfolk who voted this change upon themselves? They walk around like nothing happened. Like the Sword of Damocles isn’t hanging above their (and their cabras’) heads. Completely ignoring the fact that when you have your head buried in the sand it leaves your ass in the air.

Day Trippin: Los Lunas Mystery Rock


New Mexico. The Land of Enchantment. It’s where I was born and raised. As a kid and a young adult, I explored much of the beauty of New Mexico. Carlsbad Caverns, Bottomless Lakes, Lincoln, The Sandia Mountains, Jemez Mountains are just a few of the places I’ve adventured. But New Mexico offers so much more. There really is a kind of magic here. An enchantment, if you will, that surrounds and permeates the land and the people that populate it. In an effort to see more of New Mexico’s mysterious and magical places, some friends and I have decided to do one adventure a month to all the magical places we’ve never been. Hence, the trek to the Los Lunas Mystery Rock.


The rock has a wiki site, if you’d like to read the longer history. For those of you in love with brevity, the mystery rock is an 80 ton rock with the 10 commandments carved into it. As if that isn’t a metaphorical feat in itself, in addition the commandments were written in a Semitic language that dates to 1000 B.C.! The enigma has been there for a while and has a history of confusing the native Americans which named the rock and the mountain it rests near, “Mystery Mountain”.

Despite being located near the Los Lunas Landfill, Mystery Mountain is an impressive site. We had to hop two fences (with barbed wire) and trek through an arroyo to get to the mountain, but it wasn’t a bad hike. It only took us about 30 minutes to reach the rock itself. My first impression was that the rock was awe-inspiring and certainly mysterious. It was carved in a remote spot with diligence and expertise. The letters weren’t scratched into the rock like the rest of the graffiti around the place, but were actually chiseled into the stone. There was a lot of graffiti around the stone, places were people have left their own mark. I wondered what it is about places like this that compel people to add to them? I’ve seen several petroglyph sites and all of them have their fair share of recent(ish) graffiti. “J hearts M”, MG was Here, “Sore Foot Gulch 1957” were only a few of the desecrations I saw around the Rock. It occurred to me then that people that stumbled on places of power were always compelled to mark it for its own sake. People mark these places or build structures to commemorate them because of the power that area exudes.

Something compelled not only the Mystery Rock artisans to work here, but native American populations as well. Once we hiked to the top of Mystery Mountain we uncovered many Native American petroglyphs as well as what appeared to be the remains of several structures.

People lived here. I kept getting the impression that this was where old spirits dwelt.

The hike to the top of Mystery Mountain was rough. Loose rock, mud and ice tested our endurance with every step.

The wind was awful, literally trying to blow us off the mountain. We stopped for a rest in an old wind-break.

But even with an angry wind making us suffer for our trespass, the views from atop Mystery Mountain could not be spoiled.

All in all, it was a great adventure. While the mystery of Mystery Rock remains unsolved, the area itself still holds an enchanting power and beckons all adventurers come who wish to uncover her secrets!

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